Pitch Layout

Rugby Pitch

Goalpost: There are three ways to score using the goalpost. The first and most common is a place kick after a try is scored. A kick through the uprights is worth three points. Unlike football, the kick does not occur a specific distance from the goal line in the center of the field. In Rugby the kicker has the option of placing the ball as near or far from the try line as he prefers, however it must be placed perpendicular where the try was scored. Keep in mind that the score is considered where the ball is placed down, not where the ball was carried into the try zone. Thus, a runner can make the kick easier for the kicker if he can place the ball down directly behind the goalpost.

The second way to score via the goalpost is by a penalty kick. When a penalty is awarded, the team who is given possession of the ball has the option to kick the ball through the goalpost. This score is worth three points. The kick can either be a place kick or a drop kick, but a place kick is most common. The kick takes place from the point where the penalty is awarded, which is typically the point at which the infraction occurred.

The third way is by a drop kick through the uprights during open play. This is not a real common score, but it does occur occasionally. This difficult score is also worth three points.

22 Meter Line: A line marked on each end of the field twenty two meters from the goal-line running across the width of the field.

Half Line: Line where Kickoffs are kicked from to restart the game.

Touch Line: The lines that run the length of the field and define the edge of the field of play.


Rugby Positions

Rugby-Positions
Loosehead Prop: Position #1. Supports the hooker in the scrum downs, and act as general workhorses on the field. The loose head prop is on the left side.

Hooker: Position #2. The hooker is in the front and center of the scrum, and “hooks” the ball back through his team’s side of the scrum with his foot. Around the field the hooker acts as a workhorse.

Tighthead Prop: Position #3. Supports the hooker in the scrum downs, and act as general workhorses on the field. The tight head prop is on the right side.

Loosehead Lock (Second Row): Position #4. Serves as the main push in the scrum downs, and act as general workhorses on the field. Also known as the second row, the loose head is on the left side.

Tighthead Lock (Second Row): Position #5. Serves as the main push in the scrum downs, and act as general workhorses on the field. Also known as the second row, the tight head is on the right side.

Blindside Flanker: Position #6. The flankers are generally the most mobile forwards and since they are positioned on the outside of the scrums are often the first players to the breakdowns.

Openside Flanker: Position #7. The flankers are generally the most mobile forwards and since they are positioned on the outside of the scrums are often the first players to the breakdowns.

Eight Man: Position #8. Positioned in the back of the scrum, the Eight Man acts as the rudder in the scrum by keeping the scrum from wheeling. As with all of the scrum the eight man is a work horse who fights for possession of the ball.

Scrum-Half (Halfback): Position #9. The scrumhalf handles the ball more than any other player on the field. The scrumhalf moves the ball from the rucks and mauls to the wing.

Fly-Half: Position #10. Generally the first player to handle the ball from the scrumhalf. The Flyhalf is often a sure-handed experienced player.

Inside Center: Position #12. The inside center is usually a powerful runner who will often “crash” his run into the defense.

Outside Center: Position #13. The outside center is also often a powerful runner who will either “crash” the ball, or look for a gap to shoot through.

Wing: Position #14. Often the quickest and most fleet footed player, the wing doesn’t get the ball as often as some of the other players, but when he does it can be exciting.

Weak side Wing: Position #11. Protects and attacks on the weak side (shorter, or smaller side) of the field.

Fullback: Position #15. The Fullback serves as a safety valve to cover the ball on deep kicks and breakaway runs. Generally the fullback represents the last line of defense and prevents many scores.